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Ford have just announced a new production plant in Dagenham to employ 3000 people making a new green Diesel engine.
 

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Nothing wrong with diesel engines, so long as they are required to meet the same emission standards as petrol. Choice is always good. Let the buyers decide.

In the US we are seeing a really interesting split. In some locations gasoline is being sold at about $2/gallon while diesel is selling at closer to $3/gallon. With those prices, there are no passenger car diesel engines that have any chance of paying off ever.

How are fuel prices in the UK been moving with all the turmoil in the oil supply market (i.e. glut)?
 

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Good luck to them :)
I am done with diesel engines and I can imagine many more will be all the time petrol retailers impose a premium of as much as 10p per litre for it :(
 

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Ford have just announced a new production plant in Dagenham to employ 3000 people making a new green Diesel engine.
As I understand it, Mercedes already have their range of 'Blue Tec' diesel engines which also take out the controversial NOX contaminants.
Maybe the authorities should judge a cars' cleanliness on it's actual emissions and not some arbitrary rule that says diesels are 'dirty'!
 

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New diesel engine from Ford will still have to acknowledge other developments such as today's announcement from VW :)

The Volkswagen Golf GTE is available to order from today, costing £28,035* RRP. And unlike Volkswagen’s other electric vehicles (the e-up! and e-Golf) which are sold through a network of 25 e-Retailers, the GTE will be available through all of the company’s franchised sales outlets.


The name of Golf GTE reflects its standing in the line-up alongside the petrol-powered GTI and diesel GTD, while its pricing also reinforces this position. The new car is driven by two engines: a 1.4-litre 150 PS TSI direct-injection petrol engine and a 102 PS electric motor. Together, they produce a maximum power of 204 PS and a theoretical range of 580 miles, while maximum torque is 350 Nm (258 lbs ft). A six-speed DSG gearbox developed for hybrid vehicles is standard.


The electric motor is integrated into the gearbox housing, while further hybrid components include power electronics and a charger. An electro-mechanical brake servo and an electric air conditioning compressor make for energy-efficient braking and air conditioning. There are five operating modes: ‘E-mode’, ‘GTE mode’, ‘Battery Hold’, ‘Battery charge’ and ‘Hybrid Auto’. In pure electric mode (activated at the press of a button), the Golf GTE can travel up to 31 miles. Electric power can also be saved – for example when driving to a zero-emissions zone – and in electric mode, the GTE is capable of speeds of up to 81 mph.


With the TSI engine engaged as well, the Golf GTE can sprint from zero to 62 mph in 7.6 seconds and on to 138 mph, yet returns a combined cycle figure of 166 mpg and CO[SUB]2[/SUB] emissions of 39 g/km. As such it is expected to be exempt from VED and the Congestion Charge.


The Golf GTE’s 8.8 kWh lithium-ion battery can be charged in 3.75 hours from a domestic mains outlet, or 2.25 hours from a domestic The Volkswagen Golf GTE is available to order from today, costing £28,035* RRP. And unlike Volkswagen’s other electric vehicles (the e-up! and e-Golf) which are sold through a network of 25 e-Retailers, the GTE will be available through all of the company’s franchised sales outlets.


The name of Golf GTE reflects its standing in the line-up alongside the petrol-powered GTI and diesel GTD, while its pricing also reinforces this position. The new car is driven by two engines: a 1.4-litre 150 PS TSI direct-injection petrol engine and a 102 PS electric motor. Together, they produce a maximum power of 204 PS and a theoretical range of 580 miles, while maximum torque is 350 Nm (258 lbs ft). A six-speed DSG gearbox developed for hybrid vehicles is standard.


The electric motor is integrated into the gearbox housing, while further hybrid components include power electronics and a charger. An electro-mechanical brake servo and an electric air conditioning compressor make for energy-efficient braking and air conditioning. There are five operating modes: ‘E-mode’, ‘GTE mode’, ‘Battery Hold’, ‘Battery charge’ and ‘Hybrid Auto’. In pure electric mode (activated at the press of a button), the Golf GTE can travel up to 31 miles. Electric power can also be saved – for example when driving to a zero-emissions zone – and in electric mode, the GTE is capable of speeds of up to 81 mph.


With the TSI engine engaged as well, the Golf GTE can sprint from zero to 62 mph in 7.6 seconds and on to 138 mph, yet returns a combined cycle figure of 166 mpg and CO[SUB]2[/SUB] emissions of 39 g/km. As such it is expected to be exempt from VED and the Congestion Charge.


The Golf GTE’s 8.8 kWh lithium-ion battery can be charged in 3.75 hours from a domestic mains outlet, or 2.25 hours from a domestic wall box.


The Golf GTE is available in five-door bodystyle only and in one highly-specified trim level. Visually, it combines elements of the e-Golf and Golf GTI, with C-shaped LED daytime running lights (e-Golf) and aerodynamic horizontal ‘fins’ (GTI). Where the GTI features red, the GTE has blue accents, including across the radiator grille and into the headlights (which as on the e-Golf are LED), while 18-inch ‘Serron’ alloy wheels are fitted as standard.
Inside too, the GTI’s red highlights are turned to blue – including the stitching on the steering wheel, gear lever gaiter and seats, and a blue stripe in the tartan pattern on the sports seats. Touchscreen infotainment system with DAB radio and Bluetooth is standard, while optional navigation includes bespoke EV features such as the ability to identify potential destinations on electric range, and charging points.


The GTE also has an e-manager which allows the driver to preset vehicle charging, as well as interior cooling or heating and these functions can be operated remotely using the Car-Net app on a smartphone; a three-year subscription is standard in the UK. The speedometer and tachometer are familiar, and the latter is supplemented by a power meter in the central display, which shows the status of the battery, whether or not power is being used and the intensity of any regeneration.
(*RRP OTR after £5,000 Government plug-in car grant has been deducted)

 

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As I understand it, Mercedes already have their range of 'Blue Tec' diesel engines which also take out the controversial NOX contaminants.
Phil,

Not only Mercedes. BMW, Audi, VX, Porsche and others have been selling diesels in the US (which must meet the same no NOX, no CO emissions and petrol) for years. They all need urea (Blue) injection post treatment to be legal, thus the names Blue Tec, Blue Motion, BMW Blue, etc.

Land Rover announced that it will sell a 3.0 diesel Land Rover in the US next year - it too will have to comply with these rules if they want to sell nationwide. If they can do it for America they can do it for Europe. The issue is that then you will see the true cost of a diesel engine application and the true apples to apples comparison with a petrol engine version of the car. Which usually leads to a 3-7% take rate of diesel.
 

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Well is this going to be repeated by a Council near you ?


London council brings in parking surcharge for diesel vehicles


Islington Council votes for a £96 additional 'diesel' charge for resident parking permits











  • Car makers fear 'blanket' diesel surcharging could gain ground across the country





Autocar
by Hilton Holloway

16 January 2015






Islington Council in north London is thought to have become the first local authority to put a surcharge on the ownership of diesel-powered vehicles. On 15 January, the 48 members of the council (47 Labour and 1 Green) voted to increase the cost of a parking permit by £96 per year for all diesel vehicles registered with the borough.

If the vote is carried through the three-day ‘cooling off’ period, the charges will begin in April.
While London black cabs will be exempt in the Islington scheme, commercial vehicles with more than a 3.5-tonne overall weight will only be considered for exemptions on a ‘case-by-case’ basis.

Islington isn’t the first council to introduce surcharges for diesel vehicle parking permits. Kensington and Chelsea introduced an £18 surcharge, but it exempted diesel cars with newest Euro 5-rated engines.

However, the ‘blanket’ nature of the surcharge in Islington has sounded alarm bells within the car industry, sources have told Autocar.
It is feared that moves against all diesel vehicles – rather than just the oldest and most polluting examples – will be the beginning of a demonization of diesel as a fuel and seriously hamper the car industry’s attempts to meet the 2020 EU fleet laws for CO2 emissions.
Just ahead of the council vote, the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) wrote to the Islington Council executive to argue against the surcharge plans.
“We are concerned that the proposals to levy a £96 surcharge on parking permits for all diesel vehicles are disproportionate and do not recognise the huge technological advances made in recent years to make diesel vehicles cleaner,” the SMMT said.
"Intelligent engine design and highly efficient exhaust after-treatments, including particulate filters, now capture more than 99 per cent of particulates and around two-thirds of NOx emissions from diesel vehicles.
“The diesel surcharge will discourage uptake of the very latest diesel vehicles and could threaten further improvements in air quality and efforts to reduce CO2 emissions.

“We urge you to reconsider this proposal and would welcome a meeting with you and colleagues at your earliest convenience to discuss how technology is delivering improvements in air quality and CO2.”
Ford – which has just opened a new facility in Dagenham to build the latest-generation diesel engines – is also thought to have strongly backed the SMMT’s stance.
Recent publicity, especially in the capital, about the levels of particulate and nitrogen oxide pollution is starting to shift sentiment against diesel power, while London mayor Boris Johnson is consulting on his plans for an ‘Ultra Low Emission Zone’, which would cover central London and run on a ‘24/7' basis from 7 September 2020.

Many in the automotive world fear that this means no diesel vehicle would be allowed into central London by the end of the decade, aside from diesel-electric hybrid buses. Such developments in the capital usually heavily influence thinking around the rest of the country.





 

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Ford have gone hybrid, petrol, in the new Mondeo. Will Jaguar have a similar drive traIn in the cupboard ?

Model (4/5-door)Power
(PS)
Fuel efficiency*
(l/100 km)
CO[SUB]2[/SUB] emissions*
(g/km)
1.0 EcoBoost 6-spd manual1255.1119
1.5 EcoBoost 6-spd manual16048.7134
1.5 EcoBoost 6-spd auto16048.8146
2.0 EcoBoost 6-spd auto24038.7169
1.5 TDCi 6-spd manual (ECOnetic)120
(120)
70.6
(78.6)
104
(94)
2.0 TDCi 6-spd manual
(ECOnetic)
150
(150)
64.2
(68.9)
115
(107)
2.0 TDCi 6-spd auto15058.9125
2.0 TDCi 6-spd manual18064.2115
2.0 TDCi 6-spd auto18058.9125
2.0 TDCi 6-spd manual AWD15058.9124
2.0 TDCi 6-spd auto AWD18054.3134
2.0 TDCi 6-spd auto21058.9124
2.0 Hybrid Electric18767.399

 

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And to encourage sales of the hybrids etc Chargemaster announced today:

With the number of plug-in cars and vans in the UK now surpassing 25,000, it is clear that companies are increasingly adopting electric vehicles and are also likely to experience an uplift in employees asking to plug in when they reach their place of work.Fortunately, Chargemaster, the country’s leading provider of electric vehicle charging infrastructure, is offering UK companies a simple package to get a 7kW charge point installed by its nationwide team of qualified expert technicians for just £995 + VAT.
David Martell, CEO of Chargemaster, said: “It is great to an increasing number of consumers and businesses investing in electric vehicles, which deliver reduced running costs and lower emissions. However, to make the most of these vehicles, workplaces really need to have fit-for-purpose charging points – both for their own electric vehicle fleets, and for employees who choose to drive plug-in vehicles.
For many businesses, the investment in a workplace charging point will be quickly and easily recouped in reduced running costs. It is also a great benefit to offer employees who have chosen to drive vehicles that are less harmful to the environment.
The workplace charging points are made in the UK at Chargemaster’s facility in Luton and are made of high-quality, robust materials that make them suitable for outdoor use. As well as a great deal on 7kW charging points, Chargemaster is also offering discounts on multiple charging units and can provide 22kW units for workplaces with 3-phase power supplies.
 

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Ford have gone hybrid, petrol, in the new Mondeo. Will Jaguar have a similar drive traIn in the cupboard ?


Since it will be the transmission makers who develop these hybrid drivetrains, integral with their gearboxes, everyone will have access to a ready made hybrid transmission complete with KERS.
 

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Ford have just announced a new production plant in Dagenham to employ 3000 people making a new green Diesel engine.
Judging by the concerted effort today, lead by the SMMT and Ford, to persuade broadcasters and press to carry stories and film reports countering the increasingly negative reports associated with diesel emissions the makers must be getting twitchy. What with the London Borough confirming the plan to charge an additional £100 pa to park a diesel car.
On top of that the Government have announced that 100 "plug in" cars are to be added to government car fleet.
And today the Government have announce details of the12 UK cities shortlisted to share £35 million of funding to promote ultra-low emission vehicles (ULEVs). Bidding to be the UK’s first ‘Go Ultra Low Cities’, the shortlisted authorities have until 31 August 2015 to finalise their submissions, with the winning cities announced in the autumn.

Set up by The Office for Low Emission Vehicles and the Department for Transport, the £35 million Go Ultra Low City Scheme will deliver a step-change in the uptake of ultra-low emission vehicles. The programme will reward cities that demonstrate most potential to achieve ‘exemplar status’ – becoming internationally outstanding examples for the adoption of ULEVs in a local area.




Only fair to give the SMMTview here :)

London 11 March, 2015
The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) will today launch a nationwide consumer campaign to raise awareness about the latest low-emission car technology and challenge the increasing demonisation of diesel.

A Diesel Facts myth-busting guide will be available at dieselfacts.co.uk and in leaflet form via car makers and dealers. It comes as new consumer research reveals widespread confusion about diesel technology that, if uncorrected, could limit adoption of the latest low emission vehicles and undermine the UK's efforts to meet strict air quality and climate change obligations.
Responding to a YouGov poll, 87% of UK adults said they were unaware of the latest Euro-6 vehicle emission technology, while 54% incorrectly blamed cars and commercial vehicles as the biggest cause of air pollution in the UK. Just under one in five (19%) of people surveyed correctly identified power stations as the biggest contributors of nitrogen oxides (NOx). In fact, it would take 42 million Euro-6 diesel cars (almost four times the number on the roads) to generate the same amount of NOx as one UK coal-fired power station.
Today, SMMT together with some of the biggest car makers, including BMW UK, Ford of Britain, Jaguar Land Rover and Volkswagen, will make a unified stand and put the record straight on diesel cars. The SMMT will also urge policy makers and those considering imposing local measures to avoid confusing motorists by penalising one fuel technology over another.
Mike Hawes, SMMT Chief Executive, said, “Today’s diesel engines are the cleanest ever, and the culmination of billions of pounds of investment by manufacturers to improve air quality. Bans and parking taxes on diesel vehicles therefore make no sense from an environmental point of view. We need to avoid penalising one vehicle technology over another and instead encourage the uptake of the latest low emission vehicles by consumers. The allegations against diesel cars made in recent months threaten to misguide policy making and undermine public confidence in diesel. It’s time to put the record straight.”
Graeme Grieve, CEO BMW Group UK, said, “Diesel cars produce, on average, 20% less CO[SUB]2[/SUB] than equivalent petrol cars and so have a vital role to play in helping to arrest climate change. It is only if British drivers continue to choose diesel cars that the UK can meet its tough CO[SUB]2[/SUB] targets. Great strides have been taken to transform diesel engine emissions technology and continued, major investment from the industry is making them even cleaner.”
Mark Ovenden, Ford of Britain Chairman and Managing Director, said, We support customer choice and the market should determine the best technologies for meeting CO[SUB]2[/SUB] and air quality goals. Ford is committed to offering clean and efficient petrol and diesel engines, as well as the choice of electrified options. In terms of diesel, it is important to underline that today’s and tomorrow’s advanced diesel powertrains are vastly cleaner than in the past and are approaching parity with petrol engines when it comes to emissions that affect air quality, while at the same time delivering important CO[SUB]2[/SUB] benefits.”
From 1 September 2015, all new cars must meet the new Euro-6 emissions standard making them the cleanest in history. Almost nine out of 10 people surveyed (87%), however, confirmed they have never heard of the term. This is of particular concern given the recent decisions by some local authorities in London to charge diesel-owning residents more to park outside their homes. Some local councils are imposing surcharges based on a vehicle’s Euro Standard rating; others are imposing penalties regardless of their performance. This is despite almost three quarters (72%) of motorists opposing penalties for the UK’s cleanest cars. Of these, 16% think some diesel cars should incur a parking surcharge and others shouldn’t, according to their Euro standard emissions, while 56% believe diesel cars should not incur a surcharge at all, regardless of their rating.
SMMT is calling for policy makers to adopt a consistent technology-neutral approach towards vehicle incentives and penalties to encourage the uptake of the latest technologies and maximise the benefits for air quality. The automotive industry wants to encourage consumers to continue to choose the cars that fit their lifestyles and is committed to help the UK reach its air quality targets by encouraging the uptake of the latest vehicles, be they petrol, diesel, electric or any of the multitude of technologies now on the market.
The automotive industry’s commitment to reducing emissions is indisputable. Average CO[SUB]2[/SUB] emissions for new cars in the UK in 2013 were 128.3g/km, down 29% since 2000 – beating the 2015 target of 130g/km by two years. This progress has been matched by advances in technology to cut other pollutants, resulting in filters which capture more than 99% of particulate matter (PM10) emissions. Criticisms that vehicles fail to deliver real world improvements compared to ‘controlled test cycle conditions’ are also being addressed, with the Euro-6 standard to include ‘real world’ driving emission testing for the first time. This will give confidence to consumers and regulators alike that these new vehicles are delivering benefits on the road.
Consumers can get all the facts on the latest diesel cars via an online diesel myth-busting guide available at www.dieselfacts.co.uk and a fact sheet available from dealers and via manufacturer websites.
 

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It's the "where" of the diesel emissions that is of concern. None of those coal fired powerplants are in city centres.

However, notably missing from the discussion is the CO2 emission problem from those coal fired powerplants, which cannot easily be reduced.

Electric cars and plug in hybrids do nothing to control CO2 emissions.

Further evidence that the mpge figures for plug in hybrids and electrics is provided by Top Gear's test of the BMW i8 which actually delivers around 30 mpg as opposed to it's claimed mpge of well over 100 mpg.

Yes, the market should be used to determine powerplants for passenger car use, but as is amply demonstrated in the safety area by the wide adoption of unsafe SUV's as passenger vehicles, the market can only operate correctly if the consumers are using correct and up to date information. Currently, not only is this not the case but governments have weighed in with market distortions not shown to be effective in achieving the stated goals of reduced CO2 emissions.
 

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It's the "where" of the diesel emissions that is of concern. None of those coal fired powerplants are in city centres.

However, notably missing from the discussion is the CO2 emission problem from those coal fired powerplants, which cannot easily be reduced.

Electric cars and plug in hybrids do nothing to control CO2 emissions.

Further evidence that the mpge figures for plug in hybrids and electrics is provided by Top Gear's test of the BMW i8 which actually delivers around 30 mpg as opposed to it's claimed mpge of well over 100 mpg.

Yes, the market should be used to determine powerplants for passenger car use, but as is amply demonstrated in the safety area by the wide adoption of unsafe SUV's as passenger vehicles, the market can only operate correctly if the consumers are using correct and up to date information. Currently, not only is this not the case but governments have weighed in with market distortions not shown to be effective in achieving the stated goals of reduced CO2 emissions.
The "experts" that have been countering the SMMT position today have focused on the NOX emissions and accept the arguments about the CO2 made by engine makers. It may irritate you Jagular but the fact is that the arguments you make , all valid I am sure, are not being discussed here today.
 

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The "experts" that have been countering the SMMT position today have focused on the NOX emissions and accept the arguments about the CO2 made by engine makers. It may irritate you Jagular but the fact is that the arguments you make , all valid I am sure, are not being discussed here today.
Not yet. Interestingly, the concept of displaced CO2 emissions rather than reduced CO2 emissions is being actively discussed in the media and online over here. I note that Top Gear is discussing it.

I first mentioned this somewhat obvious problem with the idea that subsidizing electric cars reduces CO2 emissions several years ago. I am gratified to see this becoming "common knowledge".

I experienced similar gratification when the problem presented to the national pension schemes by the baby boom demographics began to gain currency and is now also "common knowledge". I've been painting this out to anyone who will listen and many who will not, for many a long year now. Obvious though this impending financial Armageddon has been since about 1961 only now is the problem under active consideration. I claim only to have noticed this about 10 years ago but then I was quite young in 1961.

I go on record here by asserting that climate change cannot be significantly beneficially affected by humanity at this stage. If CO2 is the cause and man is the cause of the CO2 then you might as well sit back and bask in the warmth. None, and I do mean none, of the current measures being taken nor planned to be taken can reverse or even halt the current claimed trend in climate. It is far too late, providing always that the climate scientists have it right, which I very much doubt that they do.

Until direct solar power can be employed for all of our energy needs then CO2 emissions must continue to rise if the current human population is to be supported. Employing nuclear power will work only if all CO2 generating power consumption can be supplanted by nuclear power and CO2 emissions are terminated. Even then, we need to address agricultural emissions for which, at the moment, there is no foreseeable substitute for CO2 emitting inputs.

Against that backdrop, the discussion about diesel v petrol v plug in hybrid v pure electric is "as a tale told by an idiot, much sound and fury signifying nothing". Pardon the implied criticism, none is intended. I merely articulate the obvious for clarity.
 

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It isn't CO2 emissions that are the issue, everyone has accepted that modern diesels have better CO2 results.....diesel fuel still causes sulphur emissions which add to acid rain, asthma sufferers etc...only when thats sorted will the Government listen to anyone.
At the moment its in the Govs' interest to increase charges on diesel cars so I would expect a new Road Tax scale soon that reflects / backs up the surcharges now being issued by councils.
 

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The contribution of transport (all transport, not just road vehicles) to total UK sulphur dioxide emissions is less than 0.5%. ULSD has been pretty universal for several years now. So I don't see sulphur emissions from diesel vehicles as being a major concern.

What is a major concern is the loss of oil company revenue and government tax income due to the wider use of diesel cars in the UK and across Europe. The UK popularity is relatively recent, but diesels have been popular in mainland Europe for much longer, predating the tighter EU emission rules. This being the case, you might expect to see major health issues emerging especially in densely populated countries with heavy vehicle traffic such as Belgium and the Netherlands. As far as I know this has not been the case. So I think the SMMT is right to challenge the "demonisation" of diesel cars and should be demanding up-to-date evidence, bearing in mind that there are many other sources of pollution than just road vehicles.
 

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It isn't CO2 emissions that are the issue, everyone has accepted that modern diesels have better CO2 results.....diesel fuel still causes sulphur emissions which add to acid rain, asthma sufferers etc...only when thats sorted will the Government listen to anyone.
At the moment its in the Govs' interest to increase charges on diesel cars so I would expect a new Road Tax scale soon that reflects / backs up the surcharges now being issued by councils.

Better CO2 results are irrelevant to the problem. According to the assertions of those 97% of climate scientists only zero CO2 emissions can work.

From a pollution perspective it is NOx that is the concern from diesel emissions. Sulfur emissions have been well controlled and in any event, sulfur is found in petrol as much as in modern diesel fuel. Formerly, high levels of sulfur were found in diesel because it was deemed unnecessary to take it out. The newer emission controls require that only very low sulfur fuel be used, diesel or petrol.
 

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The contribution of transport (all transport, not just road vehicles) to total UK sulphur dioxide emissions is less than 0.5%. ULSD has been pretty universal for several years now. So I don't see sulphur emissions from diesel vehicles as being a major concern.

What is a major concern is the loss of oil company revenue and government tax income due to the wider use of diesel cars in the UK and across Europe. The UK popularity is relatively recent, but diesels have been popular in mainland Europe for much longer, predating the tighter EU emission rules. This being the case, you might expect to see major health issues emerging especially in densely populated countries with heavy vehicle traffic such as Belgium and the Netherlands. As far as I know this has not been the case. So I think the SMMT is right to challenge the "demonisation" of diesel cars and should be demanding up-to-date evidence, bearing in mind that there are many other sources of pollution than just road vehicles.
It is an interesting theory that there is a concern about lost revenue but I can't agree that it is a major concern today.
More important is the fact that the engine makers are concerned that they failed at the outset to reduce "real world" NOX emissions to a level consistent with the Euro 6 tests achieved in a laboratory. Now we have had an acknowledgement by the makers that they got it wrong, but the move away from diesel is well under way. Ford and Jaguar, with their new engine plants must despair when they read the announcements from the UK government to buy 100 Hybrids, and then to rub it in, make millions available to cities to increase the take up of ULEVS. Who would bet that only Islington will be the only London Borough to impose a diesel parking tax. To what extent will Islington's decision cause a switch away from diesel engines ? These are the reasons that the engine makers in the shape of the SMMT are working like crazy to get in to news studios and talk to journalists.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
It is an interesting theory that there is a concern about lost revenue but I can't agree that it is a major concern today.
More important is the fact that the engine makers are concerned that they failed at the outset to reduce "real world" NOX emissions to a level consistent with the Euro 6 tests achieved in a laboratory. Now we have had an acknowledgement by the makers that they got it wrong, but the move away from diesel is well under way. Ford and Jaguar, with their new engine plants must despair when they read the announcements from the UK government to buy 100 Hybrids, and then to rub it in, make millions available to cities to increase the take up of ULEVS. Who would bet that only Islington will be the only London Borough to impose a diesel parking tax. To what extent will Islington's decision cause a switch away from diesel engines ? These are the reasons that the engine makers in the shape of the SMMT are working like crazy to get in to news studios and talk to journalists.
Speaking logically and not emotionally I doubt that Ford or JLR are losing much sleep over diesel cars. This was planned about five years ago, not five months, to meet the demand as they saw it. There are still very many people that spend their working day in a car and barely go near town centres for whom an electric car or hybrid for that matter is not much use. On the Continent you are hard pressed to even hire a petrol car, never mind buy one. Like it or not the world emphasis is on CO2 and the new emission standards are about to make a big difference to health issues. Plenty needs to be done about old non complying vehicles before banning this year's models which are what the EU has rightly demanded.
Islington is being criticised for putting a blanket parking excess on all diesels and for just making money out of parking, shortly to be banned. Being Islington however, I don't think the odd £100 a year will make any difference.
EV's certainly have their use for many who mainly use a car for shopping and the school run but I cannot see any future despite Councils using them for what? Toyota are about to launch their first fuel cell car where emissions are just a few drops of water, this may have a future, we shall see. In the meantime diesel cars still have a way to go I am afraid , like it or not.
 
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