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Well? what will your routine be? detailing or a quick nip down the mechanical wash or something in between? feel free to outline what you usually do and the products.
 

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I'm a bit of a mix depending on the car.

If I love the car then I tend to make the effort and hand wash if not its down the local mechanical wash or a jet spray.

The first "nice car" I had was an Audi TT in a dark blue that needed constant washing - got loads of expensive shampoo / wax and alloy cleaner and spent hours on it.

Since I got more family cars I've been lazy and done the mechanical jobs - but I've got a feeling the XF will be a hand washer!
 

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I have given my P & J a thorough coating of Diamondbrite. After rinsing I use a sheep skin mitten and a weak mixture of Meguiars Gold Class Car Wash Shampoo to clean the car then rinse and dry it off with a Mequiars micro fibre cloth. I also give it a monthly treatment of Diamondbrite conserver after the washing stage, also applied with a mitten. Don't use a sponge - it will leave fine scratches on the surface of the paint.
 

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I posted my detailing routine on my car forum a while ago:

Okay, here's my full detailing routine. It takes around eight hours to complete but only needs to be done once or twice a year. A full waxing procedure is 95% preparation of the paintwork, 5% waxing.

Tyres
People often don't wash their tyres but they just apply some tyre shine. This is a mistake. I use Meguair's All Purpose Cleaner to wash my tyres - use a spray bottle and coat the tyre rubber and leave for a couple of minutes, then scrub the tyre using a Mothers Contoured Tyre Brush. Rinse clean. If your tyres are very dirty then use Autoglym Engine and Machine Cleaner. Don't apply tyre shine until the very end of the detailing process. I use Mothers Reflections Advanced Tire Care. This comes in a spray bottle that looks like a miniature fire extinguisher! Just squirt a bit onto a Professional Tyre Dresser applicator (from Performance Motorcare) and wipe onto each tyre. Remember to do this at the end of the detailing process. I use a Valeter's Kneeling Pad to kneel on. This is available from RaceGlaze.

Wheels
After the tyres have been washed, it's time to do the wheels. I use P21S Wheel Cleaner (Gel or Liquid - either are fine). You can buy this as a Porsche-branded version that's slighly cheaper than the official version from any Porsche dealer. A 1-litre refill is around £11. Just buy a spray bottle from a gardening centre and put some of the P21S in there. Using a pressure washer, clean off surface direct from the wheel and then spray a liberal coating of P21S wheel cleaner onto the wheel. Leave for a few minutes - ensure that you apply some to the inside surface of the wheel as well. I use four different brushes/sponges to clean the wheel: a RaceGlaze extra long wheel brush for the inside of the rim, a sponge for the back of each spoke (where the brush cannot reach), a small wheel brush that looks like a small torch for the wheel nuts and a Mothers Wheel Brush (from Performance Motorcare) for the wheel face. Rinse off the P21S and you should have sparkling wheels. At the end of the detailing routine (and just before applying your tyre dressing) I seal the wheels using Poorboys Wheel Sealant (available from RaceGlaze) to protect the wheels. This applies a coating to resist the accumulation of brake dust. Again, I use the Valeter's Kneeling Pad to protect my old knees when kneeling down!

Paintwork - Washing
Next we need to wash the paintwork. I use Duragloss 901 shampoo for this (available from Serious Performance). Rinse the paintwork first to remove any surface dirt - I use a pressure washer held at an angle from the paintwork. Never point it directly at the paintwork. Put a bit of the Duragloss 901 shampoo into a bucket of cold water. I always use cold water for shampooing the car. It produces a better gloss finish and fewer water spots. Have a second bucket filled with clean cold water. Every time you need another scoop of shampoo, rinse the wash mitt in the clean water first to expel any dirt. Washing this way is know as the '2-bucket method'. I use a Meguair's Lambswool Wash Mitt for washing the car. You can buy one from Halfords. As you wash a couple of panels, rinse the shampoo off to prevent it drying onto the paintwork. As you wash more panels, keep the previously washed panels rinsed and wet with a hosepipe. Once the entire car has been washed, give it a good rinsing down with the hosepipe. Now, this is where I beg to differ with RJA: I do use an aquablade. During the washing process I keep it submerged in warm water to keep it very clean and to soften the silicone blade. I wipe the paintwork very lightly to remove the water. After each panel is wiped I rinse the aquablade clean again. Finally, I dry the paintwork using a microfibre cloth (I use Ettore blue MF cloths which you can buy from B&Q). (You can also squirt some quick detailer on the wet paintwork before you dry it if you are not going to wax the car). Don't forget to open the doors, bonnet and boot and wipe down any water from the edges.

Paintwork - Claying
Now that the paintwork has been washed it's time to remove any embedded dirt in the paintwork. The process is known as 'claying'. I use the Meguiar's Smooth Surface Clay Kit (£22.99 from Halfords). This contains everything you need to clay your paintwork. However, I have purchased a gallon of Meguair's Last Touch detailing spray (available from Elite Car Care) to use as the lubricant for the clay. I put a 50:50 dilution into a spray bottle. Knead the clay into a disc and spray a bit of lube onto it so that it doesn't stick to your hands. Keep a clean, dry MF cloth handy to wipe clean the paintwork after it has been clayed. Spray some of the lube onto a small section of the paintwork and then lightly rub the clay disc across the lubes section. You may feel a bit of resistence first as the clay pulls off dirt embedded in the paintwork. Use more lube if the clay starts to snag on the paintwork. After a few straight strokes, the clay disc should glide effortlessly across the paintwork. Your paintwork is now clean. Clean off any excess lube using the MF cloth. If you look at the clay bar it will probably be dirty. Just fold it over a couple of times to expose a clean surface. Repeat this process for the entire body of the car (just the painwork).

Paintwork - Cleansing
In preparation for waxing we need to remove any previous sealants, glazes or waxes. I use P21S Paintwork Cleanser for this. It's a white thick paste that you apply to a small section at a time, wait a minute or so and then buff to a gloss finish using an MF cloth. Repeat until the whole car is done (paintwork only).

Paintwork - Waxing
I use P21S Concours Carnauba Wax. It comes with its own foam applicator pad. Use as little as possible to to a small section of the paintwork at a time. It really needs to be spread thinly. By now your paintwork should be immaculately clean so the wax should go on very easily indeed. If it does not and it starts to 'spot' or you feel resistence when applying it then you haven't prepared the paintwork properly. Just leave for 30-60 seconds and then buff to a gloss finish using a clean, dry MF cloth. Repeat until the whole car is done (paintwork only). Do not apply to glass/plastic/rubber! You may want to apply a second coat for an even better finish and more paintwork protection.

Glass
You can use two products: Autoglym Fast Glass which is a spray for quickly cleaning the windows to remove surface dirt, followed by Autoglym Car Glass Polish. The latter needs to be applied and left to dry. Then use an MF cloth to remove the polish and leave the windows sparkling clean. You should only use this on the exterior glass surfaces. The Autoglym Fast Glass can be used on the inside glass surfaces.

Exhaust Tips
I use Meguiars NXT Generation All Metal Polysh. Just apply, wait for it to haze and then buff to a shine.

Interior - Leather
I use two products: Zymol Leather Cleaner followed by Zymol Treat Leather Conditioner.

Interior - Dashboard
Simply wipe with Chemical Guys Natural Look New Shine Dressing for an 'as-new' dashboard finish. I also have an assortment of detailing brushes for the air vents and other nooks and crannies. A small cheap paintbrush will do just as well.

Interior - Carpets
A quick vacuum and spray with an air freshener.
 

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Can I buy your second hand cars please?

Wow Roma that's some routine!
 

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^ That's only done once or twice in a whole year. It produces a finish that is better than showroom condition.

During the Winter months I wash the car once a month, and during the Summer it's washed fortnightly. These regular washes take around 3 hours so are not as intensive as the annual claying treatment.

For a regular wash I do the tyres (using Megs APC neat or diluted 50:50), then the wheels using P21S. Then the paintwork is washed with Duragloss 901 shampoo using a Megs lambswool mitt and the 'two-bucket' method. Each panel is rinsed with clean water as I go along to stop the shampoo drying. Then the whole cars is rinsed with clean water. I sometimes use the power washer or sometimes just a regular hosepipe.

The car is dried with an MF towel after being aqua-bladed touch-dry. It's given the just-waxed look by spraying the paintwork with Megs Last Touch quick detailer or another decent quick detailer. I do this step in one of two ways. If I have a bit of time i'll dry the rinsed car first and then use the quick detailer spray on the dry paintwork. If i'm short on time i'll spray the wet bodywork with quick detailer and dry the whole lot off. There's very little difference in quality of finish. The door/door sills/boot/bonnet/fuel filler edges are dried, as are the wheels.

Then the interior is wiped down with a damp MF cloth, vacuumed and windows cleaned with Autoglym spray. The windows are also cleaned on the outside. Finally, the tyres are dressed.

Job done in about three hours from start to finish.
 

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£12 at the local Hand Car Wash. Inside and Outside all done in about twenty mins. No Claying included mind ! :roll:
 

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For claying you need a nice, sunny, warm day. It's extremely therapeutic and is not very difficult to do. You're really just wiping the clay bar over the paintwork very lightly (using lots of lubricant like a quick detailer). Initially you'll feel a slight resistance as the imperfections and impurities in the paintwork lead to friction with the clay bar. As you wipe more (with plenty of lube) you'll soon feel virtually no resistance at all as the clay bar will have lifted (i.e. pulled!) the tiny, microscopic particles away from the paintwork. The paintwork will then feel silky smooth, as if you're just waving your hand in free air, and you'll know that it's time to move on to the next bit of the bodywork. I usually clay a 2 ft. x 1 ft. section at a time. As soon as the clay bar surface looks slightly soiled, you fold it over itself to expose a clean surface.

The only danger is that a speck of grit in the clay will ruin your paintwork so it's a high-risk activity.
 
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