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Discussion Starter #1
No, not in the water; in the XF :lol:
I find that I use the Paddle gear shift mainly for engine braking. I use it when approaching stationery traffic, roundabouts and so on. I also use it to enter a corner when a speed reduction is required and when approaching a speed restricted area. I tell myself that in doing so I am saving on brake wear, reducing the amount of dust on the wheels and generally improving my fuel consumption.
My wife on the other hand has yet to use the paddle for any reason :(
What do you do :?: Paddle or not to Paddle, that is the question :lol:
 

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I use the paddles when I want to "press on" and for most over taking.
 

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Both engine braking and overtaking
 

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Doesn't the auto box change down anyway to assist braking :?:
 

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Use it in slow traffic and and when need quick overtaking.
Also when entering motorway to have more torque.
 

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I use the paddles when i want a quick squirt of speed as i can kickdown manually when i want to and usually by two gears rather than the one which the box would do.
 

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I very rarely use the paddles on motorways or dual carriageways, but use them a lot on 'normal roads'. I'll often knock it down two gears when overtaking rather than use kickdown, and a quick blip down to fifth really improves the handling and throttle response on sweeping corners.

It might have helped if the paddles were column mounted somehow rather than wheel mounted, as I have sometimes hit the wrong side when the steering wheel was turned upside down.
 

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i use the paddles for open-road drives. in my experience it makes a big difference to fuel economy.

for the commute, i leave it in auto :)
 

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bob said:
in my experience it makes a big difference to fuel economy.
I've found this as well. When being driven in Sport Manual the economy improves immediately.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
xfphillips said:
I find that rather strange, because doesn't Sport mode increase the rpms and deliver more power to the wheels? :?
I am pleased you wrote that because I was unable to reconcile the claim that economy is improved. I drove the other day and switched between the two modes, Drive and Sport, and noticed that the revs went up by 5000 on switching to Sport. I then tried to understand why I would be saving fuel. Went home and googled torque etc but it was all too much for me so I forgot all about it until now :lol:
So the question remains, is fuel economy improved or not :?:
 

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If you drive it in manual mode you're in charge of the gear changes, not the car and provided the upshift isn't being limited by roadspeed I generally drive it with much lower revs.

Mine is through 1300miles now so too early to tell where the economy is going to end up as it's still improving. Driving it in manual mode does make a difference though. That's probably because, having worked with large diesels all my life, I usually drive at quite low revs unless I'm on a mission!

I have discovered though that it doesn't like Tesco diesel. That's three cars on the bounce that haven't liked the stuff.

With every revolution the engine makes, valves have to be depressed, masses have to be accelerated, slowed down, reversed and pumps driven etc. There's also the mechanical resistance to overcome. The net result is that the slower the engine is turning the less energy is required. I have yet to see a torque/power graph for the XF but I've been told that it's very flat. If this is the case then lower revs wouldn't make too much difference to 'casual' driving. The engine does though respond to higher revs very favourably (as we all know!!) but when you put operate the engine in it's higher power range, whether you're using that power or not, you pay the price in extra fuel for all those extra valve compressions etc.
 

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Qhunter said:
If you drive it in manual mode you're in charge of the gear changes, not the car and provided the upshift isn't being limited by roadspeed I generally drive it with much lower revs.
yep, same here. also, if you're cruising on a motorway and put your foot down, the gearbox downshifts unnecessarily. having manual control negates that ;)
 

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Doesn't the XF owners manual say premium fuel is recommended? I've been using BP Ultimate Diesel from day one. This is the first car that I've used premium fuel with, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
xfphillips said:
Doesn't the XF owners manual say premium fuel is recommended? I've been using BP Ultimate Diesel from day one. This is the first car that I've used premium fuel with, though.

Well as I understand it, Jaguar in common with other makers, map the engine to accommodate some really rubbish grades of fuel. If they knew that only premium fuel was going to be used I suspect that the performance of the XF would be considerably enhanced to utilise such fuel. Because they don't have that control they dare not assume it is used. In those circumstances I would be surprised if premium fuel made any difference one way or the other :?
 

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Oh well I'll keep using it for now. The price difference doesn't concern me too much as I can claim 10% off fuel bills through work, which evens the price out a little.
 
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